Featherdale Wildlife Park - Sydney Australia

Sydney’s Hands-On Wildlife Experience

Eastern Bearded Dragon

lizards / dragons

At Featherdale Wildlife Park we care for a wide range of Australian native species. We intend to document them in detail for your reference on our website. This is a work in progress. Please let us know if you would like to learn more about a specific species that is not yet listed and we'll add them to the top of the list.

Blue Tongue Lizard

Tiliqua scincoides scincoides

facts and figures

KINGDOM

Animalia

PHYLUM

Chordata

CLASS

Reptilia

ORDER

Squamata

FAMILY

Sauria

GENUS

Scincidae

SPECIES

T. scincoides

Did you know?

  • There are 6  species of Blue Tongue Lizards in Australia

  •  Blue tongues have somewhat unusual body proportions: a big head and long body with very short legs and small feet. 

  • The blue tongue's main defence strategy is bluff. It faces the threat and opens its mouth which is designed to frighten the attacker. 

Description

The Eastern Blue-tongue is silvery-grey with broad dark brown or blackish bands across the back and tail.  The lizard is known as blue-tongue because its tongue can range from bright to dark blue, and it has a habit of displaying it prominently and hissing loudly when disturbed.


Habitat

Blue-tongues usually live found variously in open woodlands, at the margins of forest and field, semi-deserts. They prefer to be in open country with lots of ground cover such as tussocky grasses or leaf litter. They shelter at night among leaf litter or under large objects on the ground such as rocks and logs.


Diet

Blue-tongues eat a wide variety of both plants and animals. Their teeth are large and they have strong jaw muscles so they can crush snail shells and beetles. 


Social organisation and Reproduction

Blue-tongues live alone for most of the year, however mating occurs but between September and November. Female Blue-tongues give birth to live young three to five months after mating, between December and April. The young are independent at birth, and disperse within a few days.

Eastern Bearded Dragon

Pogona barbata

facts and figures

KINGDOM

Animalia

PHYLUM

Chordata

CLASS

Reptilia

ORDER

Squamata

FAMILY

Agamidae

 GENUS

Pogona

SPECIES

P. barbata

Conservation Status

Species status information sourced from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.

Did you know?

  • When threatened, it inflates its throat and displays its beard. If further provoked, it opens its mouth to display the bright yellow colour of the lining of its mouth. The eastern bearded dragon performs this beard display more often than the central bearded dragon.

  • In 2005 at Melbourne University, it was discovered that bearded dragons produce a mild venom. This venom is harmless to humans and majority of other animals.

Description

The Eastern Bearded Dragon is usually grey-black in skin colour and is sometimes reddish-brown, yellowish-brown, or dark brown. If excited and at higher temperatures head, flanks and legs have a yellowish to orange colour. Usually however they are rather dark, from yellowish to grey and black. The inside of the mouth is generally a bright yellow colour.


Habitat

They are semi arboreal and perch on exposed places such as tree branches or logs, retreating to lower and cooler places when too hot. It is most common in eastern Australia south of Cape York Peninsula, but specimens have been collected from Cape York, through central Australia, and even from the west coast of Australia.

Diet

The eastern bearded dragon feeds on a variety of small animals, including mice, smaller reptiles, and insects. In captivity, it also eats leaf vegetables such as clover and small flowers, fruits, and berries.


Social organisation and Reproduction

The males are territorial and permit only females and juveniles in their territory. Dominant males are usually the biggest dragons and get the highest perches. Females tunnel into dry earth to lay a clutch of eggs.